Poverty in American and its impacts on Children’s Academic

Even though public education is a basic right for every children of America, many children in poverty suffer from low grades and are at high rates of drop-outs. A generation of poor uneducated children becomes adults that produce another generation of poor uneducated children; it goes on without an end to it.

Following data and charts are part of a research project that is done by Bryan Mon.  Full Report is available upon request.

*Related charts under every title

Poverty report

Population of under 18 years old are the highest in poverty as of 2009.  Please click on the graph for larger view. Source: U.S.Census Bureau,  http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/data/incpovhlth/2009/highlights.html last revised on September 16, 2010

Fig_ 1 Source-U.S Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, 2009 and 2010 Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Poverty Rate of Black and Hispanic family of Queens County, New York in 2007. Please click on the graph for larger view. Source: Social Explorer Professional, http://www.socialexplorer.com/pub/reportdata/htmlresults.aspx?ReportId=R10000214

Table_1- Poverty Rate of Black and Hispanic family of Queens County, New York in 2007

Poverty by Race (Overall). Please click on the graph for larger view. Source: U.S.Census Bureau http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/data/incpovhlth/2009/highlights.html last revised on September 16, 2010

Table_2 Poverty by Race

Unemployment Rate in New York State from 2000-2010. Source: New York State Department of Labor, http://www.labor.state.ny.us/stats/laus.asp

Table_3 Unemployment Rate in New York State from 2000-2010

Blacks and Hispanic are at the lowest level of income comparing to Asian and white.  Their income decreases from 2008 to 2009 along with White. Source: U.S.Census Bureau, http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/data/incpovhlth/2009/highlights.html

Fig_2 Real Median Household Income by Race and Hispanic Origin-1967 to 2009

According to the United Nations data, net primary school enrollment ratio male and female (percent) in the United States from 1991 to 2005 has decreased as following.  Source: UN Data A World of Information,

http://data.un.org/Data.aspx?q=Net+primary+school+enrolment+ratio+male+percent28percent25percent29&d=WHO&f=inIDpercent3aSDEC12 ,

http://data.un.org/Data.aspx?q=Net+primary+school+enrolment+ratio+female+percent28percent25percent29&d=WHO&f=inIDpercent3aSDEC13

Fig_3   Net primary school enrolment ratio male (percent)  Fig_4  Net Primary school enrolment ration female (percent)

National Center for Education Statistics presents that low income families have high rate of school dropped out as following. Source: National Center for Education Statistics,  http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2009/dropout07/tables.asp

Table 4-National Center for Education Statistics Data

 

Final Analysis Chart by Bryan Mon based on data from above table.  According to the research and data, it concluded that children in poverty and/or children of low-income families have more chances of facing drop-out from school. Therefore, there is a possible correlation between poverty and academic failure in those children who are in poverty.

Event dropout rates of 15- through 24-year-olds who dropped out of grades 10–12, by family income-October 1972 through October 2007

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s